Omnio iPad

Continuing the evolution of a new generation of medical reference

Problem 

In Omnio v1 (late 2012), the team introduced the idea of "the spine." It was a fixed navigation along the left side of the screen. Feedback revealed it had some practical and design issues. First and foremost, display ads must be supported within the app. The geometry of the spine conflicted with the horizontal nature of the display advertising, creating a suboptimal, "jumbled" perception. There was also significant feedback to suggest that Search is the most desired function — and needs to elevated in the experience.

Solution 

In an effort to validate Omnio's thinking, VL did a blue-sky imagination of the Home screen with new screen-top navigation. We then ran over 1,000 respondents through a series of simple user tests to understand their visceral reactions. In an apples-to-apples comparison, we proved that folks indeed preferred the top-navigation. 

One user commented that the top-design "felt too empty."

One user commented that the top-design "felt too empty."

Interestingly, in VL's first pass, we tried to seize the opportunity to simplify Omnio's navigation down to a few key sections. 

Interestingly, in VL's first pass, we tried to seize the opportunity to simplify Omnio's navigation down to a few key sections. 

A design ethos is to simplify, eliminate down to the bare essentials. VL has observed from previous e-commerce work that people prefer "a little stuff."  A little noise makes visitors feel comfortable, as if they're at the buffet. It feels cozy, friendly — and that's what we think happened here. 

After adjusting the navigation, we then set out to update the application, and address a lot of feedback from v1.0. We increased font sizes, consolidated icon types, and introduced a whole lot of new functionality.

VL led the introduction of Reference and Feed sections into Omnio v2.0, making it nearly a complete suite for the medical professionals. 

Within Reference, we focused pretty intensively on updating the font hierarchy, which seemed jumbled and difficult to decipher. The team throughly designed and tested tons of variations of fonts, font sizes, and layouts on iPad vs Mini, and standard versus retina displays.

For Calculators, the team also focused on moving away from a form-type calculator, to an interaction where a user steps to a result. Physicians and staff should be able to get to results 100% faster. 

After prototyping, we created a comprehensive style guide, and worked with Omnio's stellar engineers to implement it.

Result

Omnio's lifetime rating (427 total) is 4.5 stars. One reviewer remarked:“This app is user friendly, searching clinical information is a matter of few strokes. The retrieved information is current, well organized and clinically relevant.”

Check out Omnio in the App Store

Published on by Pauline Shin.